Homily for October 27, Thursday of the XXX week of Ordinary Time


Homily for October 27, Thursday of the XXX week of Ordinary Time

Today’s first reading is so inspiring and comforting that I am almost left at a loss to know what more I can say. Almost, but not quite; I think it’s interesting to note the relationship between the first reading and the Gospel reading.

St. Paul tells us that nothing can get between us and the love of God. St. Paul makes a fairly comprehensive list of the things that cannot separate us from the love of Christ, and emphasizes that God alone will judge us. We shouldn’t really fear anything on earth, knowing that we only have to answer to God, and He loves us and is with us at all times.

Yet, in the Gospel reading, it seems that something has come between Jesus and the Pharisees, who try anything and everything to make Jesus stop preaching and leave, with even what might be taken as implicit threats. Knowing how they behave in other Gospel passages, their warning to Christ today sounds a bit like members of the mob telling someone that it would be a shame if something were to happen to them, because there are bad people out there, and maybe they should pay protection money or leave. Herod himself actually shows no interest in killing Jesus; he has the chance to do it later when Pilate sends Jesus to Herod to be judged, and Herod sends him back unscathed. So, Jesus replies to the Pharisees saying to tell that fox “Herod” that it won’t be that easy to get rid of Him.

Then, Jesus laments over how so many people in Jerusalem have rejected both Him and the prophets before Him. It seems that the people’s own pride and sinfulness has separated them from God. But we have to remember: Jesus returns to Jerusalem later and dies for those same people. God loves us always. Not even our sin can keep God from loving us.

We have to remember, though, that if we keep saying “no” to God, even though God will always love us, we can end up separated from His presence. God loves us so much that He respects our free will to act against His plan. God loves the people in hell, but He will not force Himself upon them. With that same love, as long as we live, He constantly offers us the gift of forgiveness and reconciliation. May He help us to trust in His love always, following His commandments faithfully and turning to Him for help, for pardon, and for strength, in all the joys and difficulties of our daily lives. And so, may He gather us like chicks under His wing in heaven forever.

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About Matthew Green

I am a translator, origami artist/teacher, and photographer, a blogger, former philosophy professor, and I love to sing. You can see my photos on Flickr and buy prints of some of them on Fine Art America. You can find me on Instagram, Twitter (@mehjg), and in various and sundry other social media sites on the web.
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